Fight spring-time allergies with these tips

Spring is on the horizon and if the Upstate’s winter is any indication, allergy season might be especially rough this year.

“We really have not had a consis- tently cold winter,” said Angela Lombardi, an allergist with Allergic Disease and Asthma Center. “You really need consistently cold, freezing weather to kill most plants that pollinate.

Tips for a safer & more enjoyable outdoor activities

Sunny delightful warm weather is coming! It is time to enjoy the great outdoors but there could be a risk for possible allergic reactions. With careful planning and good decision making, allergy sufferers can prevent and minimize problems. Many parents and children are signing up for spring and summer camps. We can address potential risks and give you tips on how to handle them.

Flu season is right around the corner!

Adults and Children with Asthma are at High Risk for Complications from the Flu

  • Asthma causes inflammation in the airways and the Flu can worsen asthma symptoms and trigger asthma attacks.
  • People with asthma are more likely to develop pneumonia after having the flu than those who do not have asthma.

Ragweed allergy heats up with climate change

If you think your ragweed allergies are getting worse, you may be right. And global warming may be the culprit. That’s not good news for the estimated 36 million Americans who suffer from ragweed allergy, the primary cause of fall allergy symptoms. Ragweed season unofficially begins August 15.  The pollen counts peak around September 19th.

Back to School tips for Students with Allergies and Asthma

By: Angelina Lombardi, M.D.

School will be back in session in a few weeks and with that comes a great deal of anticipation and preparation by parents and students alike. There are school supplies to buy, teachers to meet, clubs and activities to join, and new and old classmates to see. On top of this already hectic list of things to do,

Steps to avoid summer colds

“Everything seems to be in bloom this June in many parts of the country. That can be nice for outdoors enthusiasts, but not so much for those who suffer from allergies. Along with itchy eyes and a runny nose, people with allergies often complain they catch every cold going around.

One expert, 

Allergic Reactions to Insect Stings

By: Neil L. Kao, MD

Many of us experience pain, itching, and swelling from insect stings. These symptoms are effects from or reactions to the chemicals in insect venom that irritate the skin and muscle tissue surrounding the bite.  Remember the biologic purpose of insect stings is defending the hive by either causing pain or outright killing the attacker.

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